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Blue Teapot Theatre Company at Culture Night 2011 Photo: Reg Gordon

History


ADI began in 1985 under the name Very Special Arts Ireland (VSA Ireland). Allied to VSA in the USA, VSA Ireland was also part of City Arts Centre’s innovative artistic programme. VSA Ireland’s profile was raised significantly in 1993 when Jean Kennedy Smith, founder of Very Special Arts, became US Ambassador to Ireland.

In 2001 VSA Ireland changed its name to Arts & Disability Ireland (ADI) in order to reflect contemporary thinking in relation to language and disability. From 2003 ADI was based at Create, the national development agency for collaborative arts.

Since 2005 ADI has broadened its programme and services to include audiences with disabilities as well as artists. This reflects our belief that the opportunity to experience the best of Irish arts is everyone’s right, and is central to fostering debate and inspiring creativity in all people. 

In recent times ADI has enjoyed a period of significant growth, during which we have piloted and developed a wide range of projects and services.

Mary Murray and Joe Hanley in The Pride of Parnell Street by Fishamble.

Mary Murray and Joe Hanley in The Pride of Parnell Street by Fishamble.

ADI Director, Pádraig Naughton, at Creative Thinking Network 2015 in Dance Limerick

ADI Director, Padraig Naughton, at Creative Thinking Network 2015 in Dance Limerick

 

Image of Padraig Naughton, Lisa Damico and Ambassador Jean Kennedy Smith at the VSA Conference, Boston, Massachusetts, 2011. ADI's director is presented with the Innovative Programming Award for the First National Tour of Accessible Performances. Photo: Ron Goodman

Padraig Naughton, Lisa Damico and Ambassador Jean Kennedy Smith at the VSA Conference, Boston, Massachusetts, 2011. ADI’s director is presented with the Innovative Programming Award for the First National Tour of Accessible Performances. Photo: Ron Goodman

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